Breaking the fast

Text by: Kimmy Baraoidan
Photos by: Kimmy Baraoidan and Bong Ranes

Muslims arrive at the mosque for the morning prayer on Eid al-Fitr. Photo by: Bong Ranes.

Muslims arrive at the mosque for the morning prayer on Eid al-Fitr. Photo by: Bong Ranes.

Six in the morning and the green mosque quickly filled up with Muslims. They were there to celebrate Eid al-Fitr, which marked the end of Ramadan. Eid al-Fitr is Arabic for ‘festival of breaking the fast.’ During Ramadan, Muslims fast from sunrise to sunset for a month, refraining from any food, drink, and sexual relations. Aside from fasting, Muslims engage in more prayers and read the Quran.

The women wore elaborately embroidered, bright-colored, or printed khimars and hijabs (head scarves) that matched or complemented their dresses. Most of the men and boys, on the other hand, wore either round-neck shirts, polo shirts, or polo, and only a few wore thobes – those white long-sleeved robe-like garments. Not all of them wore a taqiyah or cap. The imam was dressed for the occasion, clad in a white thobe and a matching white taqiyah.

Muslim men during prayer on Eid al-Fitr. Photo by: Bong Ranes.

Muslim men during prayer on Eid al-Fitr. Photo by: Bong Ranes.

A few brought food packed in individual boxes and Styrofoam food containers. At first I thought it was a potluck kind of setup but I would later on learn it was not. Tables, chairs, and tents were positioned outside the mosque, ready to receive members of the congregation and guests.

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  1. Pingback: A day of fellowship and sacrifice | The Alternative Magazine

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